THE 2015 PANTONE COLOR OF THE YEAR

In Uncategorized by Andy Bozeman0 Comments

Do you ever think about the trends of color? Phrases like : orange is the new black, red tape, black Friday, White Christmas, green building, blue blood, and a personal favorite of mine, rammer jammer yellow hammer, all have moments of intense focus, when conversation, advertising, the clothes we wear, even sofa pillows and wall paint, trend toward a particular color or combination.

It’s no different with the colors of our living spaces. In the past, color has trended through several distinct phases. The 1950’s and 60’s saw a combination of avocado + banana yellow + hot pink + pumpkin orange. In the 70’s and eighties it was burgundy + teal + shrimp. The 90’s were influenced by a TV show. The Miami Vice palette consisted of every pastel color + black + creamy white, but never true red.

The hottest colors of 2013 and 14 were : Pink + Peacock blue + tangerine + brown color combo, Shades of gray or black with bright primary colors, Gray + blue-green, and Shades of orange.

Currently, the most popular color phrase is “Neutral and Natural,” which translates to “any color of dirt.”

2015 won’t see a shift away from neutral and natural colors, but the dominant color will be influenced by the world’s drinking preference. The most popular wine on earth in this particular moment is Marsala. So for the near future all the colors of dirt – desert sand, river bed, forest floor, mountain hues – will become the backdrop for the accent-color of a glass of wine.

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Images: Pantone LLC Pantone has deemed “Marsala” its color of the year. The selection influences decisions and product development in multiple industries, including interior design.

Pantone, a subsidiary of X-Rite Inc., is a provider of professional color standards for the design industries, recently dubbed MARSALA its color choice for 2015.

“Marsala enriches our mind, body and soul, exuding confidence and stability,” according to Latrice Eisemen, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute.

She adds, “Much like the fortified wine that gives Marsala its name, this tasteful hue embodies the satisfying richness of a fulfilling meal, while its grounding red-brown roots emanate a sophisticated, natural earthiness. This hearty, yet stylish, tone is universally appealing and translates easily to fashion, beauty, industrial design, home furnishings and interiors.”

 Specifically identified as Pantone 18-1438, the color is complex and full-bodied without overpowering, according to Pantone.

“Add elegance to any room by incorporating this rich and welcoming hue in accent pieces, accessories and paint,” the company suggests.The plush characteristics are enhanced when the hue is applied to textured surfaces, making it an ideal choice for rugs and upholstered living room furniture, the company says.

Nurturing and fulfilling, Marsala is also a natural fit for the kitchen and dining room—ideal for tabletop, small appliances and linens throughout the home, according to Pantone. The hue will be especially prominent in striping and floral patterns found in printed placemats, dinnerware, bedding and throws.

The company said its annual color of the year declarations have influenced product development and purchasing decisions for more than a decade in multiple industries, including fashion, home décor and industrial design.

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The hue is described as full-bodied and welcoming.

So, if you would like to follow the trend and change your color scheme, but you’re unsure, first just hold up your goblet of Marsala and see the world through a wine-colored glass. At least then, you’ll know what to expect and surprises won’t be coming at you out of the blue.

More information: www.pantone.com.

 

 

Thank you,

Andy Bozeman

Andy Bozeman is the author of
IF I’D KNOWN THAT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN WHEN I BUILT MY HOUSE, I MIGHT’VE GONE CAMPING INSTEAD
Available from Amazon Kindle
See similar educational articles related to the American dwelling industry at
American Home Journal, also by Andy Bozeman.

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