Craftsmanship Gone Bad – Right Angle, Wrong Direction

In 1 ALL, Quality by Andy Bozeman1 Comment

These actions don’t mix : Installing-Trim and Working-Too-Fast.

A true trim-craftsman is sure and steady in every aspect of every job. To stay sure and steady requires skill combined with integrity, and the discipline to properly complete every tiny detail.

This is the right way to install crown molding at an inside corner: The molding must be cut and installed so that it appears that the wood is simply folded to turn the corner. To do this the trim carpenter will use one of two techniques, a miter cut, or a coping cut.

The miter cut in it’s simplest form involves cutting a 45 degree angle on the end of each trim piece. When pushed together in the corner, the pieces fit as though they are one.

For Coping, one trim piece is cut straight on the end, then pushed into the corner. The other trim piece is hollowed-out, or coped, at a proper angle so it fits snugly against the first.

Both techniques require careful attention. The angles of the cuts are going in multiple directions at the same time. Skill is required to keep track of which way to make a cut. Get it right and it looks like the trim grew there. Get it wrong and it looks like the trim is trying to escape.

crown molding right 9451

CORRECT – Trim fits together properly.

crown molding wrong bell building interior (82)

WRONG – The trim was cut backwards, nailed up anyway, and left for dead. The “trim carpenter” tried to hide the error, by staining the wall in the gap. Crazy!

As a customer, you have the right to expect a construction job to be completed with skill, integrity, and discipline. If someone tries to pass off bad quality, don’t tolerate it. Make them get it right!

 

Thank you,
Andy Bozeman

Andy Bozeman is the author of
IF I’D KNOWN THAT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN WHEN I BUILT MY HOUSE, I MIGHT’VE GONE CAMPING INSTEAD
Available from Amazon Kindle

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